How to store Coriander Leaves | Cilantro Leaves

During the season I always ponder on how to store the coriander leaves for weeks. Coriander leaves are such integral part of Indian cuisine and you can’t imagine making a gravy dish without the ceremonial addition of coriander leaves. Over the years we had followed different ways to store the fresh coriander leaves, some worked, some didn’t. Finally we hit upon this method which really works well.

Amma’s younger sister visited us sometime back and she passed on this tip to us. I wanted to try it out right away and was so happy seeing the fresh leaves being fresh over weeks. We have successfully preserved the leaves in it’s freshness for 2 – 3 weeks.

I know many of you may know better ways. And this is too simple a method to even record. But I am not really in a mood to write a lengthy post with recipe.

Since Coriander leaves are part and parcel of every Indian cuisine, I am happy finally finding a way to store it well.

Trim the root ends which normally gets sold along the green coriander leaves.

Soak in a bowl of water and rinse well

See the fine dust that is left behind.

Let them drain over a colander

Then spread over a cloth to make sure the water is completely absorbed. If require, put it under fan.

Slowly cover it up like this to absorb whatever water might still be in the leaves.

Take the bowl that you want to store the leaves, cut a newspaper to the size of the inner bowl.

Place the fresh leaves inside.

The stalk can also be stored to be used in Rasams. They add such flavour.

Take another paper cutting and cover over the fresh leaves. Refrigerate. There is no need to freeze the leaves.

This is after two weeks. Of course I have been using and opening it in between.

If required change the paper used to cover the leaves.

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How to store Coriander Leaves | Cilantro Leaves
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Instructions
  1. Trim the root ends which normally gets sold along the green coriander leaves.
  2. Soak in a bowl of water and rinse well
  3. See the fine dust that is left behind.
  4. Let them drain over a colander
  5. Then spread over a cloth to make sure the water is completely absorbed. If require, put it under fan.
  6. Slowly cover it up like this to absorb whatever water might still be in the leaves.
  7. Take the bowl that you want to store the leaves, cut a newspaper to the size of the inner bowl.
  8. Place the fresh leaves inside.
  9. The stalk can also be stored to be used in Rasams. They add such flavour.
  10. Take another paper cutting and cover over the fresh leaves. Refrigerate. There is no need to freeze the leaves.
  11. This is after two weeks. Of course I have been using and opening it in between.
  12. If required change the paper used to cover the leaves.

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Have a great week ahead!

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33 comments

  1. Thanks for the tip! I can never use up a bunch of cilantro before it turns to slime. I ever tried grwoing it myself one season in desperation, but it goes to seed as quickly as it turns to slime. I have to try this!

  2. this has been really helpful..especially since coriander leaves cost quite a bit out here and is not readily available, not to mention a whole bunch that goes to waste cos it rots in the fridge. im gonna try ur method,

  3. Absolutely love the tip. I too had learnt something like this recently. What I do is, after washing, I wrap them in paper towels and keep them in fridge, though cutting ends is also a good one 🙂

  4. I neve rknew we could store them like this , I should send this link to my sis too.
    I store them in the frezer ( as i don't mmake indian food every day) i wash them and funley chopp then and put them in a zip lock and freeze them when ever i need them i take from the freezer.

  5. Thank you everybody!

    MiliThanks for asking, she is doing much better. I have been updating the contributors through email, sorry if your email is missed.

    btw she was not my maid but my help's daughter.

  6. Hi Srivalli, Good to know about your help's daughter.

    I had the post bookmarked when the contribution campaign was on but I didn't follow-up. While cleaning the old links I saw that those posts so longer exist and feared the worst…

    -Mili

  7. Wow! I cannot believe how fresh those leaves look after 2 weeks! Mine turn to slime in just a couple of days. Thanks for this tip, I will absolutely put it to use.

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